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Operation Finally Home, A Non-Profit, Helps A Local U.S. Army Veteran Receive A Home Just In Time For The Holidays

ODESSA -- Emil Busby, a U.S. Army veteran, helped oversee the construction of a home through the non profit organization, "Operation Finally Home."
ODESSA -- Emil Busby, a U.S. Army veteran, helped oversee the contruction of a home through the non profit organization, "Operation Finally Home."

He didn't know at the time that the home would eventually be his.

"It's awesome to be able to do something like that, especially me, being a wounded vet myself and do it for another soldier, another one of my brothers," Busby said.

The home was originally built for another veteran but, he was later transferred to a different city leaving the home up for grabs for a different veteran.

Bubsy was encouraged to put his name in for consideration..

"Okay, I don't think I deserve this house, I've got all 10 fingers, all 10 toes. My wounds are a lot on the inside," Busby said.

Busby's wife, Sunny, says her husband was in the army for 10-years, and he's served in three deployments.

Busy earned a Purple Heart after he was injured in combat.

And Sunny says her husband's knee hurts every day.

"While the wounds may not be physical, they're still just as real," said Sunny.

"These gentlemen and ladies come home from war and we don't know what war is like but, this is one way we can say thank you and welcome them home," said David Martin, president of Permian Homes.

The Busby family says finding their own home has been a struggle.

"Cost of living is crazy ridiculous. We had been in a nice house that fit all of comfortably but, they raised the rent. They raised it so much so that our individual raises could not match the cost of living increase," Sunny said.

Now, thanks to "Operation Finally Home," the Busby family have their own mortgage free home.

Something Busby says is a huge burden off their shoulders.

"Lots of us sacrifice our youth, when everybody else is in college, we're out on the front lines doing stuff so everybody can go to college. We get out, we're 30, we're 38, we're 40 and we don't know how to make it as a civilian. It's a big change," Busby said.

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