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Tanning

Whether you decide to tan in the sun, in a tanning bed or in a spray-on booth you should be aware that not all of them are safe, and repeated exposure could mean greater risk of illness.
Summer is almost here, and many people will begin spending more time out side and tanning.  

Whether you decide to tan in the sun, in a tanning bed or in a spray-on booth you should be aware that not all of them are safe, and repeated exposure could mean greater risk of illness.

Most people know that tanning outdoors can expose you to harmful UV rays, so limiting exposure and protecting yourself when outside is important to minimizing sun damage and your risk for skin cancer.  Did you also know that tanning beds deliver 10 to 15 times the UV radiation of natural sunlight, boosting the user's risk of developing deadly melanoma by at least 75%.  The more you use a tanning bed, the higher your risk, regardless of age or gender.

If you're already limiting your UV exposure and looking for other ways to  tan, be informed about the safety of the alternatives.  You may have seen "tanning pills"- capsules that claim to tan you from the inside out- but these pills could be dangerous, have not been FDA approved, and may not be effective. 

Of all your options, using a self -applied tanning cream is the safest bet.  These external cosmetics are FDA approved and are not thought to be harmful when used properly.  You may think a spray on tan is equally as safe, but be mindful that sprays are approved for external use only, and should not be inhaled or sprayed in the mouth, eyes or nose.  Remember, even if you use a tanning cream, you still need to use sunscreen when outdoors.   

Be smart about UV radiation exposure. Apply sunscreen and wear protective clothing when going outside, avoid tanning beds, and be informed about products that claim to give you a golden tan.  Your health depends on it.
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