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Evaluating Storm Damage with the National Weather Service

The day after the storm the National Weather Service sends out a team of meteorologist to evaluate the damage.
The day after the storm the National Weather Service sends out a team of meteorologist to evaluate the damage.

“Whether it's straight line winds, whether it’s tornadic, the possible strength of the tornado winds that’s the kind of stuff that we do,” said Mark Strobin, Warning Coordination Meteorologist, NWS.

Over the Memorial Day weekend, the Midland National Weather Service issued 119 warnings for West Texas. 83 were severe, 19 were tornado warnings and 17 were flash flood warnings.

“For the most part it looked like it was straight line winds except for one instance where a pumpjack was pretty much pulled over,” Strobin said after evaluating the damage. “The pipe bended the pumpjack and the pumpjack weighed about 78,000 pounds so in that case we are thinking it was probably a tornado.”

The areas most affected by the storm included from the northwest part of Martin County to the north and eastern parts of Howard County.

“To have four days is not that common at all. It's been a while, probably a decade at least since something like this has happened,” Strobin said.

According to Strobin, the majority of the damage came from straight line winds and few evidence of tornadoes was seen.

“Historically memorial day weekend has been a very active weekend that we've had a lot of severe weather,” he said.

As of Tuesday, no injuries were reported.

“At least the weather will be calm for the next week,” Strobin said.

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